Tree Valuation

There are various ways to ascribe a monetary value on a tree, but the first thing to decide is Value to "whom".

Value is subjective but the process of ascribing a tree value in a tree valuation report should be undertaken through logical and understandable methods. We offer the CTLA tree valuation system (Council for Tree and Landscape Appraisers) and their methodologies are based on standard valuation methods that any formal valuers would recognise if they are familiar with, for example, the RICS Blue Book.

This is important because if the valuation is challenged, and that usually happens in a court of law, then the valuation that follows logical rules and is clearly explainable to a judge, will usually be the one that they support in the judgement.

The same applies to insurance companies. If presented with a claim that is based on solid logic and an understandable mathematical progression that takes into account clearly defined factors, they usually agree quite quickly which helps the claimant to get paid. This is truly avoiding making a drama out of a crisis (where have I heard that before?).

So value is useful for assessing losses and a reliable valuation system delivered in a specifically designed tree report can speed up settlement, but there are other equally valid applications. For instance, if you are assessing the value of a tree stock, say to define a budget that should be applied to maintain that resource, it is a useful exercise to assess the "replacement value". That figure would show what the costs of replacing the resource would be if the money ascribed to it's maintenance was o prove inadequate to property protect it.

When municipal tree officers commission one of these tree valuation appraisals, the disparity between the vast replacement cost and the sometimes tiny management budgets makes a stark contrast.

When you think about it, it is actually funny to ascribe a value to something that can't easily be sold (at least as a living entity) and inevitably in taking this tool of society and adapting it to give a value in exchange for £'s or $'s for a living tree fixed in a location, there will be some room for interpretation, it's just that using the CTLA system the variables are manageable and small so the valuation tree report is more reliable. We think that's important.